I just wrote a recap of some of the front-end work that went into the new Reware Vintage website. Check it out if things like that are semi-exciting to you. Also, what’s up with the NBA lockout? You guys been seeing this shit?

I just wrote a recap of some of the front-end work that went into the new Reware Vintage website. Check it out if things like that are semi-exciting to you. Also, what’s up with the NBA lockout? You guys been seeing this shit?

rashystreakers:

I know I only posted yesterday that Reware Vintage was going live soon, and it went. Dan Nixon pushed it live at lunch today and I gotta say, he did a killer job on it. Make sure to check it out on a few devices as he spent some extra time making it super flexible. @turboclaw did the design and development and @joshaweston helped out a little with some branding and icons. Been in the hopper for awhile. Nice to see it up and running. Okay, stop reading this post and go buy something!

I’ll be writing a longer post later about some of the more technical aspects, but for now, suffice it to say that I’m thrilled to finally be able to show the site off. Like Josh said, it’s been in the works for a very long time!

rashystreakers:

I know I only posted yesterday that Reware Vintage was going live soon, and it went. Dan Nixon pushed it live at lunch today and I gotta say, he did a killer job on it. Make sure to check it out on a few devices as he spent some extra time making it super flexible. @turboclaw did the design and development and @joshaweston helped out a little with some branding and icons. Been in the hopper for awhile. Nice to see it up and running. Okay, stop reading this post and go buy something!

I’ll be writing a longer post later about some of the more technical aspects, but for now, suffice it to say that I’m thrilled to finally be able to show the site off. Like Josh said, it’s been in the works for a very long time!

What do you mean, you don’t like IE6? Really?

remy:

Today I read the latest in the long, long, long line of why I won’t support IE6. How fucking droll. If IE6 support is part of your job or the contract - then that’s what it is, that’s the job, that’s the challenge of your work.


I am sick and tired of the same old boring posts and even web sites dedicated to why IE6 should die. We all know IE6 should die. Microsoft knows IE6 should die. Heck, even IE6 knows it needs to die. It’s been walking around like a fucking zombie for years.

See now, here’s the thing: not one person today installs IE6 as their main browser. In fact, given the choice, I’m willing to bet that no person would choose to use IE6 as their main browser over any other browser. But that’s not the problem. So that we’re clear: nobody is fucking choosing to use IE6 and they’re certainly not using that browser just to piss you off!

While we’re at it - when IE6 does eventually die, who’s going to do the find and replace on all the blog posts from IE6 to IE7, then IE7 to IE8, etc.?


It’s a simple matter of when XYZ company bought all their machines for the users back in the XP / IE6 days, it cost them a butt load of money. Companies don’t like spending money where they (think) they don’t have to. So upgrading all those PCs again is not a priority for them. Remember that upgrade comes with support, maintenance, down time, etc - something that costs (another butt load of) money.

I ran some training once fairly recently at an institute of science where the developers told me that the browser with the highest usage, by far, was IE6. It was their job to support that browser.

Their job. They get paid. If you don’t want to support IE6 - then don’t. Nobody is twisting your arm to accept that job as a freelancer. If you’re so against IE6 and you’ve got a full time job - I do hope you brought that up during the interview - and if not, if you’re really hate IE6 - you could quit and find another job, right?

The fact is that IE6 is a difficult environment because it’s unsupported, particularly against todays requirements of web sites. So we charge more for it.

If your client is building a brand new product, and unless they have hard stats showing they need to support IE6, you’ve no reason to support older browsers, and there’s lots of ways of determining the types of browser usage those potential users will have. However, if they’re an existing company, and they do have IE6 traffic that warrants supporting by their business - then that’s just part of your job.

Some development teams are the size they are, and employ the people they do just because of browsers like IE. If it weren’t hard, there’d be a bunch of people out of the job.


Developing for the web requires that you know how browsers work. The challenge of the job is making those web sites work everywhere. Knowing the ins and outs of browsers is what separates a regular Joe Average apart from the Mr James Awesome. If you don’t want to learn about IE6’s quirks (or IE7 or IE8 or IE9’s) then don’t. Someone else will take the work.

As for me, I’ll be holding my breath waiting for the next reason why IE6 should die - like it’s not documented well enough already.

My sentiments, nearly exactly. Don’t get me wrong; I enjoy working on a project more when I know that I don’t need to fully support old technology, but I’m also aware that people aren’t using IE6 just to intentionally piss me off. Hell, most of the people doing the “Die, IE6!” dance don’t even remember having to support IE 5, let alone Netscape 4. Take a couple laps around that track and come complain to me about IE6’s double margin float bug.

Bottom line, if it’s your job, then be a professional and do your job.

"Keep in mind the mobile experience doesn’t replace the full site experience. The mobile experience supplements the full site experience based on the visitor’s needs at a specific point in time, with specific tasks to accomplish."

I’m not a jQuery hater – far from it. I use the shit out of some jQuery, […] Once I started using it, I came to appreciate it very quickly, and once I began to appreciate it.. Well, that’s how we get to now, where apparently I can’t write fucking JavaScript anymore.

totes profesh - too much jquery.. ?

I had this exact thought over the weekend when I was doing some noodling on a mobile site. Do I really want to force the user to download 50kb of jQuery just so I don’t have to relearn the “old” way of writing an XHR? Guess it’s probably time to pull out the big red book for a refresher anyway.

"Why are we cursing Internet Explorer 6. It was not for lack of innovation and standards support when it first shipped. It is because that standards support was buggy and incomplete – that’s right, it was half baked. And now we see Chrome and Safari releasing unfinished implementations as well.”

IE6 has not hindered development of the web, instead it’s our outdated thinking that is in danger of doing that.

Andy Clarke

Hell yes. The sooner we decide to stop letting the lowest common denominator limit what we create, the faster the industry will advance as a whole.

Only a few years ago browser testing meant that I would spend hours of my time (and a lot of my clients’ money) on attempting cross-browser, pixel perfection. Now, not only is this not practical or affordable, it’s not possible. That is, unless I reduce my designs to the lowest common denominator or use expensive workarounds.

[…]

All of this brings me to what exactly browser testing mean in 2009/10. For me it simply means ensuring that my content and functionality are accessible (by using meaningful markup, foundation CSS and unobtrusive scripting) and that a design does not look broken when viewed through older or less capable browsers. This approach is liberating. It stimulates me to design to the edges of what browsers are capable of rendering.

— Andy Clarke, What Does Browser Testing Mean Today?

Chrome Frame sounds sweet and all, but here’s another reason why I’m not making grand plans for dropping IE6 support.